Yesterday, I went to my next 2 follow-ups at the hospital. The first, at 10 am, was to address the broken clavicle. The first x-ray they brought up was from the day I was flown in to shock trauma. It showed that the fracture was in the center of my clavicle, and was partially displaced, but that the ends were still touching. Then they had me take a new x-ray, to see what it looks like now, in case there had been any movement.

Not My Actual X-Ray

This new x-ray, unfortunately, showed that the pieces had shifted, such that the broken ends had moved considerably, and were no longer touching. The fracture looked exactly like the picture above, though this is not my actual x-ray. Obviously, the displacement is such that even a simpleton like me can see that something is amiss. I decided to speak to their orthopaedic trauma specialist, Dr. Robert O’Toole, who heads the University of Maryland School of Medicine Division of “Orthopaedic Traumatology,” two words which, by the way, spell-checker tells me do not exist. He is also their Director of Clinical Research.

We discussed the fracture in great detail, and Dr. O’Toole was extremely gracious in providing answers to my questions regarding the risks, benefits, and quality-of-life issues related to the decision that I now faced…whether or not to repair the clavicle. For many reasons, most quite practical, but a few admittedly emotional, I decided to have my clavicle repaired.

clavicle_plate

In order to repair it, the clavicle must be aligned, and then plated, and screwed, as in the image above. The surgery will be soon…within the next week or so.

 

 

 

 

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